Posts Tagged ‘aztec’

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On Tuesday June 18, 2013 we gathered at El Rincon de Los Trujillo’s, the residence of Pilar Trujillo, Adán Trujillo y familia. In a place and space where ancient wisdom has been passed down for generations. Wisdom that has sustained the people from Chimayo and many other mountain desert communities.

On this 18th day of June 2013 we gathered as community to learn ancient wisdom and knowledge of the people of Central Mexico. We learned about the hidden knowledge within the Aztec Sun Stone/Calendar. Our cosmetic identity and mission on this earth was brought to light by Maestro Mazatzin.

In this post photos of the evening are being shared. I have asked several community members to share a short reflection about the evening’s platica. It was an honor to have been able to document these great gathering.

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This image of the Aztec Sun Stone was taken in 2005. The Stone is at the Museum of Anthropology and History in Mexico City.

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Reflection by Pilar Trujillo:

It’s been quite some time that I’ve taken a deeper interest in learning more about who I am as a spirit in this sometimes ailing and painful body that can be wracked with emotions. I find myself yearning for the wisdom of my ancestros, knowing that for centuries they knew how to live in harmony with the tierra and each other. The Aztec calendar has long been something I’ve wanted to know more about. So when I heard that Maestro Mazatzin Aztekayolokalli was going to give a presentation in Albuquerque about it, I decided to go. But on the morning of the presentation, I didn’t feel well. I wanted to see him, but did not want my chronic health issues to flare up.

I really believe that if we open ourselves up to what Creator wants for us, things fall into place without strain. This was evidenced with how seamlessly the gathering was organized. It started when compadre Jorge García made a comment on compadre Luis Peña’s Facebook post saying that he wanted to bring Mazatzin up to the norte so that all of us could make a connection with him. I immediately offered our land and home for the following evening as a space for a plática. Then Luis offered to help with outreach. Our comadres Annette and Beata offered food. And just like that, the gathering was set. Several other people helped with food, drinks, documentation, setting up, etc. That’s the power of focusing your intentions and actions on a common cause: things get done!

The plática by Mazatzin was amazing. I keep reflecting on what it means to be an instrument of harmony, which is what an Azteca really is. I also learned a lot about myself in a very short amount of time, like how my day sign is Dog/Izkuintli, which gives me a lot of admirable traits, but must be balanced with rest and restoration or else I’m of no use to anyone.

As we wrapped up the evening with Maestro, I couldn’t help but feel like I’ve been waiting for this for a long time. I mentioned this to him as we chatted after the plática. And he agreed. Yes- we have all been waiting for this for a long time: to be re-introduced to who we really are, to our most sacred selves, our cosmic identities. El es Dios!

Reflection by Annette Rodriguez:

Earlier I’d been reading about the trials in Guatemala, where former President Efraín Ríos Montt was convicted of genocide against 1,771 indigenous Mayans. His scorched-earth attacks in the 1980s displaced at least 29,000 Mayans, and were meant to destroy the Ixil communities completely. When the verdict against him was read, the assembled Ixil men, women and children stood and called out to the judges, “¡Tantiuxh!” (“Gracis!/Thank you!”). My spirit was in mourning as I walked toward the gathering with Maestro Mazatlin. I thought of the centuries of loss, of pain, of displacement of our indigenous communities throughout what we now call the Americas. I thought of the distance between us all.

Yet, once across the field, as those I hold dear and those I am destined to hold dear assembled, I found strength as Maestro Mazatlin re-introduced us to our undeniable relationship to one another, and our responsibility to one another. The evening was an invitation to deeper and lasting alliance and affiliation. Rather than a romantic connection to an imagined Aztec past, we were invited to act in our real present. Reminded to recall, in each sacred day, our connection as colonized peoples and to continue the struggle to practice, to understand, and to connect as we always have, as our elders and our people have maintained since time immemorial. I am a daughter of Zacatecas, whose family was displaced to the Arizona and Southern New Mexico copper mines. Across a state-imposed distance, we retain our love of and connection to Juchilipa. I have often felt a cultural divide from Northern New Mexico, but I was deeply moved to be in a space with and created by hermanos y hermanas from Califas, Central México, the Norté, Sandia, Santa Clara, and Zuni Pueblos, and beyond.

As we gathered, Jorge Alberto Garcia Atilano discussed anti-Mexican state policies and social structures, like those we see in Arizona, Texas, and even in our local Whole Foods Markets. And in that moment, I saw that our action of assembling, learning and teaching was an act of resistance—on this evening, this was our shared responsibility. Maestro Mazatlin’s unfolding of histories of conquest and resistance, and his invitation for us all to reflect and act in relation to one another, to our responsibilities granted us by the creator, opened up rich potential for continued dialogue across borders, in the space and time we share.

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On May 17th and 18th El Santuario de Chimayo will be the site of a velacion y ceremonia that comes from Chalma, Estado de Mexico, Mexico. Danzantes from many parts of New Mexico and other parts of the Southwest will come together to honor El Cristo Negro de Chalma. I have been participating with this ceremonia for about 6 or seven years and I have been celebrating with my family for the fourth year. Amanda and I are the pardrinos of the Cendal, which is a cloth decorated with flowers that dresses the cross. This is our second year as padrinos. It has been one of the greatest honors bestowed on my family. As the days come closure to Friday we prepare the Cendal for the velacion y ceremonia. This time of year has similar spiritual gifts as the ones I gain during Cuaresma and Semana Santa. It is a time for spiritual healing, reflection, growth and re-energizing me for one more year of working with the ills that affect my community.

The Danzantes we have met in the past few years have become more they just friends. We have become familia. We have connected with a common spirituality that is difficult to describe with words. It can only be described in that prayer we share and offer for each other. I am also honored that the Danzantes have entrusted me to document this ceremony for them with my photography and I am thankful for the opportunity to learn about it as well. In respecting the sacredness of the ceremonia I don’t share the images I capture except for a couple which are at the end of this text. I believe that it is my obligation and duty as a photographer to respect the sacredness of ceremonia.

Many blessing have come to my little family of four. We have been given the opportunity to participate in a ceremony that has been here since pre-colonialization by Europeans. I am honored to be a part of this wonderful group of people whose heart and soul as huge as the universe. This weekend will be filed with prayer, blessings and great gente coming together in honor El Señor de Chalma y El Señor de Esquipula. Please come and join us in prayer.

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Photos used with permission by the Danzantes. Always keeping in mind that Danza is a sacred ceremony and a prayer. Please respect the photos by not downloading if you are not a danzante or do not have their permission. Thank you for understanding and respecting this sacred tradition.

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Siempre Lupe

© 2011 Angelo J. Sandoval

Touring the Annunciation House
On my way to the second floor, starting to
climb up the stairwell.
What do I see?¿Que miro en frente de mi?
A mural,
Yes,
Un mural de
La Virgen de Guadalupe.
This mural is about eight from top to bottom.
A sign of esperanza.
La esperanza de que La Virgen morena,
Siempre quidando,
Mirando,
Un symbulo de juctica,
Un symbulo de fe.
The mural, la imagin,
Brings a calming feeling,
As you climb the stairs

La Virgin De Guadalupe, the Patron saint de la Casa Sandoval. An inspiration for hope. The photo above was take at a local restruant. The devotion a la Virgin Morena is part our life in the Sandoval house hold.